Archive for the 'weekly assignments' Category

Portfolio 3 due 21 December!

Posted in weekly assignments on December 12th, 2011 and

I asked for the due date for Portfolio 3 to be 14 December, and I am changing it to the week after, final exam week, so I can comment one more time on your stories before you put your portfolio together. I will have commented on everyone’s work by this Wednesday, the 14th.

Good luck on your work!

final homework

Posted in weekly assignments on November 30th, 2011 and

 

WEEK 14—7 Dec Hypertext fiction

 

 

 

“Hypertext fiction is a genre of electronic literature, characterized by the use of hypertext links which provides a new context for non-linearity in “literature” and reader interaction. The reader typically chooses links to move from one node of text to the next, and in this fashion arranges a story from a deeper pool of potential stories.”

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertext_fiction

 

Please read/spend time with the following hyperfiction pieces, and make sure the volume on your computer is turned on:

 

Young-Hae Chan, “Dakota,” http://www.yhchang.com/

 

Shelly Jackson, “My Body & a Wunderkammer,” http://www.altx.com/thebody/

 

dane, “him,” and “HELP,” http://www.eastgate.com/ReadingRoom.html#

 

Caitlin Fisher, “These Waves of Girls,” http://www.yorku.ca/caitlin/waves/

 

 

 

How are these stories told? What are the stories? In what ways do such stories alter, surprise, or confound your ideas of reading and making meaning? What do they have in common with traditional narrative and how are they different? What is the reader/viewer’s role in making meaning or creating the story?

 

 

 

Continue and preferably finish writing, revising, and editing your short story. How traditional is your narrative? What demands does it make upon the reader? What does your reader bring to the experience of making meaning from your story, and what might your reader take away from it? How would you like your reader to think, feel, experience as she reads and thinks about it? What can you do in your story to require more participation, thought, connectedness from your reader?

 

 

 

As a comment to your own story, ask a question or two about matters you feel you most need guidance on, and then read through the drafts of your peers’ stories and answer their questions as helpfully as you can.

 

 

 

Protected: homework week 12

Posted in weekly assignments on November 17th, 2011 and

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Protected: homework week 11

Posted in weekly assignments on November 10th, 2011 and

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homework wk 10

Posted in weekly assignments on November 3rd, 2011 and

WEEK 10—2 Nov Telling Your Story

Australian Aborigines say that the big stories—the stories worth telling and retelling, the ones in which you may find the meaning of your life—are forever stalking the right teller, sniffing and tracking like predators hunting their prey in the bush.

—Robert Moss, Dreamgates

 

Please read Charles Bukowski, “The Most Beautiful Woman in Town” and Kelly Link, “Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose.”

What do these stories have in common? What are they about? What do we learn about the narrators? How does each narrator reveal and/or conceal information? How would you describe the pace of each story, the unfolding of its plot? What questions do you have about each story?

Begin writing your short story. Decide upon the point of view of your narrator, the levels of knowledge or information this narrator has, and what the narrator’s relationship to the readers will be. How reliable is your narrator? How honest? How informed? And how will you signal to readers necessary messages about the narrator?

If you have questions about where you’re going, ask them at the end of your draft so your peers and I can chime in. No one’s advice is sacrosanct; listen to your own instincts, but be open to the possibility of a breakthrough suggestion or observation. Read through the drafts of your peers’ stories and comment as helpfully as you can.

 

portfolio ii

Posted in weekly assignments on November 1st, 2011 and

Portfolio II—Poetry—Due week 11; 11/9—10 points

 By week 10, you should have at least four drafts of poems. Choose two of these for your portfolio. You may want to choose your best pieces; i.e. your funniest, most intelligent, most subtle, graceful, evocative, or powerful. You may want to choose pieces that represent a turning point in your understanding of the subject or of the potentialities of the genre, or of yourself as a writer. You may want to choose work that you wish to develop further and ask me specific questions about how you might do that.

These poems should be reworked and revised carefully, showing mindfulness of the kinds of issues we’ve discussed in the past several weeks. Clichés should be rooted out, unexpected language and imagery should be sought, unnecessary words or lines should be ruthlessly excised, and the poems should aim toward signs of inspiration, showing me and other readers that you have been brought to an unexpected place in your thinking and writing through the creative process.

Your one-page cover letter to me should describe this process of creating these poems and working on poetry over the last several weeks. Tell me your thoughts about poetry, how these have evolved this semester.

These are due in hard copy in class. Any questions about the assignment should be registered as a comment to this post so that others might benefit from it, as well.

your homework for week 9

Posted in weekly assignments on October 27th, 2011 and

WEEK 9—26 Oct Poems About the Self and the World

 I am looking for a poem that says Everything so I don’t have to write anymore.

–Tukaram

Please read the following poems for next week: John Berryman, “Dream Song 14,” Charles Bukowski, “Startled Into Life Like Fire,” Mark Strand, “Old Man Leaves Party,” Edgar Allen Poe, “Alone,” Charles Simic, “Carrying on like a Crow,” Alice Notley, “from Eurynome’s Sandals,” Dolly Lemke, “I never went to that movie at 12:45,” Jill Alexander Essbaum, “Apologia,” David Clewell, “This Poem Had Better Be about the World We Actually Live In,” Walt Whitman, “from Song of Myself (1 and 52),” Frank O’Hara, “Ave Maria,” Allen Ginsberg, “America.”

Please give each poem its due, but choose at least one (preferably more) to read closely, revisit through the week, meditate upon. Pay attention to its formal elements as well as what it says. How do these poems reflect upon life and comment upon the relationship between self and the world? What conflicts are present? What is the mood and how is it communicated through sound and imagery? Do these poems offer something new to your own thoughts and experiences? What in these readings do you admire, marvel at, puzzle out? Be prepared to discuss your reactions in class.

Discover and post a poem. Read and respond to your peers’ work.

Also, please respond in a comment to the peer critique you received. Explain how the critique was helpful, ask any further questions about your writing, and describe what was most illuminating about the critique, helping you understand something about your writing differently.

 

homework for week 8

Posted in weekly assignments on October 20th, 2011 and

WEEK 8—19 Oct  Death Poems

“Poetry began in the matriarchal age, and derives its magic from the moon, not from the sun. No poet can hope to understand the nature of poetry unless he has had a vision of the Naked King crucified to the lopped oak, and watched the dancers, red-eyed from the acrid smoke of the sacrificial fires, stamping out the measure of the dance, their bodies bent uncouthly forward, with a monotonous chant of “Kill! kill! kill!” and “Blood! blood! blood!”

Robert Graves, The White Goddess: A Historical Grammar of Poetic Myth

Cultivate your vision of moon-magic, the dead and resurrected god, ecstatic dancers, blood, and death.

Please read the following poems for next week: e.e. cummings, “Buffalo Bill’s,” Robinson Jeffers, “Vulture,” Christina Rossetti, “Song,” James Tate, “Depression,” Billy Collins, “Grave,” D.H. Lawrence, “Bavarian Gentians,” Gerard Manley Hopkins, “Spring and Fall,” Robert Frost, “To Earthward,” Thom Gunn, “In Time of Plague,” W.H. Auden, “[Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone],” Seamus Heaney, “Mid-Term Break,” Jane Kenyon, “Let Evening Come,” Ben Jonson, “On My First Son,” W.H. Auden, “In Memory of W.B. Yeats,” and Emily Dickinson, “I Died for Beauty—but was scarce.”

Please give each poem its due, but choose at least one (preferably more) to read closely, revisit through the week, meditate upon. Pay attention to its formal elements as well as what it says about death. How do these poems reflect upon life and comment upon the relationship between life and death, the dead and the living? What is the mood and how is it communicated through sound and imagery? Do these poems offer something new to your own thoughts and experiences? What in these readings do you admire, marvel at, puzzle out? Be prepared to discuss your reactions in class.

Discover and post a death poem. Read and respond to your peers’ work.

 

your homework for week 7-13 October

Posted in weekly assignments on October 13th, 2011 and

Creative Writing—Queens College—Fall 2011

 

WEEK 7—13 Oct  Love Poems

 If you know what you are going to write when you’re writing a poem, it’s going to be average.

–Derek Walcott

The above epigraph reflects what we discussed yesterday about inspiration and discovery, allowing your poem to find and guide you rather than being the boss of the poem. Experiment with discovering your poem rather than writing it.

Please print out the poetry packets in their entirety and read the following poems for next week: Raymond Carver, “You Don’t Know What Love Is,” W.B. Yeats, “Her Triumph,” Ezra Pound, “The River-Merchant’s Wife: A Letter,” Robert Hayden, “Those Winter Sundays,”Anna Akhmatova, “N.V.N.,” Christopher Marlowe, “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love,” Andrew Marvell, “To His Coy Mistress,” Emily Dickinson, “Wild Nights—Wild Nights” and “The Soul Selects Her Own Society,” Theodore Roethke, “My Papa’s Waltz,” Allen Ginsberg, “A Supermarket in California,” T.S. Eliot, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” Adrienne Rich, “Two Songs,” and Sharon Olds, “Sex Without Love.”

Please give each poem its due, but choose at least one (preferably more) to read closely, revisit through the week, meditate upon. Pay attention to its formal elements as well as what it says about love. What is the kind of love being described? How is it rendered differently or similarly to other sentiments about love that have moved you in the past? Does it offer something new to your own thoughts and experiences? What is it about this poem that you admire, marvel at, puzzle out? Be prepared to discuss your reactions to this poem in class.

Discover and post a love-poem. Read and respond to your peers’ work.

Your extended critiques (to be posted on your peers’ blogs) are due next week.

 

homework week 6

Posted in weekly assignments on October 6th, 2011 and

Creative Writing—Queens College—Fall 2011

WEEK 6—5 SEP  Poetry as Bound Speech

 Poetry isn’t made of ideas, but words.

                                                             —Stéphane Mallarmé

Read the poems provided and prepare to discuss them in class using the following vocabulary: sonnet, villanelle, stanza, meter, rhyme, rhythm, scansion, alliteration, off-rhyme, assonance, consonance, onomatopoeia, prosody, simile, metaphor, allusion, trope, image, symbol. I have provided brief glosses of these words in the reading entitled, “Poetry jargon,” but you may want to do further internet research. Also develop opinions about what each poem says or means, and to what degree you appreciate both what it says and how it says it.

Choose one poem, either one written by a classmate or one I’ve provided, and analyze it closely, preparing an interpretation of what the poem means, how well the form adheres to a strict structure, and what in the poem is effective or moving.

Write a poem of your own using formal elements of the kind displayed  in these poems. You may wish to write a sonnet or a villanelle, but you should be prepared to explain how your poem uses formal elements and/or departs from them. Please post your poem either as a blog-post or as a page on your blog. Spend some time reading through and commenting on the work of your peers. Bring your poem in hard-copy to class next week if you would.

Please consider the pros and cons of writing in bound speech. I’d like to discuss these in class.

 


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